Baltimore Riots

A+Maryland+Transit+Authority+patrol+car+burns+at+North+and+Pennsylvania+Avenues+on+Monday%2C+April+27%2C+2015%2C+in+Baltimore.+%28Jerry+Jackson%2FBaltimore+Sun%2FTNS%29

Courtesy Tribune News Service

A Maryland Transit Authority patrol car burns at North and Pennsylvania Avenues on Monday, April 27, 2015, in Baltimore. (Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun/TNS)

If you have access to any kind of media, or know anyone who does, you have heard about Baltimore within the last few days.

Riots have broken out After Freddy Gray’s Funeral Saturday April 25th. People all throughout the city were outraged over the 25-year-old’s death.

The most common reason for the riots seems to be the idea that Gray’s spinal injury, which later resulted in his death, was caused when he was thrown in a cop car, not buckled in, and driven around in such a rough manner that he was thrown around the vehicle.

Much of the riot seemed to be happening simply out of anger and confusion rather than actually for any cause.

Many of people committing the violent actions were teenagers. To try and combat this, Baltimore kept its schools open in the hopes of distracting the teens with being forced to go to school rather than continuing the violence.

The government decided action needed to taken to try and stop the riots. They brought in 1500 members of the national guard to keep people in check and a few days later, local authorities enacted a curfew from 10pm to 5am. No one was allowed outside within this time frame.

Tuesday night, roughly 2002 protesters stood outside blatantly refusing to follow the new curfew. The line of police who were in riot gear threw in smoke canisters and fired pepper balls into the crowd. Several of the protesters picked up the canisters and threw them back at the line of police. Within minutes after the crowd died down.

The family of Freddy Gray openly said they did not support riots and tried desperately to prevent them.