Abortion Policies Show Major Differences in Candidates

A+college+student+protesting+the+Supreme+Court+decision+in+July+of+this+year%2C+which+struck+down+certain+abortion+restrictions+in+Texas.

Courtesy Tribune News Service.

A college student protesting the Supreme Court decision in July of this year, which struck down certain abortion restrictions in Texas.

Meghan Koerick, Staff Reporter

Abortion is a huge controversial subject in the world and politicians statements on the subject can affect the amount of votes they get drastically. There is a Right-to-Life Party recognized in many states, including New York, which can endorse candidates and bring a large voting bloc.

Recent debates have shown that Hillary Clinton and her running mate Tim Kaine have both said abortion is a legal right upheld by the Supreme Court. Donald Trump and his running mate Mike Pence generally say it should be considered a crime and banned.

Hillary Clinton apparently want taxpayers to continue pay for some abortions and support abortion until the moment of birth. She says there should be no restrictions on abortion during pregnancy and is definitely pro-choice.

Clinton’s running mate Tim Kaine is a Catholic, but some of his views on the subject (expressed in previous Senate and gubernatorial campaigns) don’t line up with the official stance of the Vatican.

According to USA today Kaine said, “I think you should live your moral values, but the last thing, the very last thing that the government should do is have laws that would punish women who make reproductive choices…and that is the fundamental difference between a Clinton-Kaine ticket and a Trump Pence ticket.”  Kaine has previously, as Governor of Virginia) supported a ban on partial birth abortions.

Donald Trump and his running mate are completely against abortion except in the case of rape, incest, or saving the life of the mother. He also promises to completely cut off federal funding (of more than $500 million per year) for Planned Parenthood but did (during debates against other Republicans this spring) recognize all the organization has done treating people of both genders for STDs, and important help for women with cervical and breast cancer early screenings.

Pence says that “I’m pro-life and I don’t apologize for it,” according to the Los Angeles Times.

Pence thinks women should face some sort of punishment for getting an abortion. He also supports a bill (currently before the legislature in Indiana) that says the mother of the child should have to get an ultrasound and receive a description of the fetus regardless if it is medically necessary or not. Kaine argues that woman should have the right to a choice and said to Pence (during their Vice Presidential debate), “why don’t you trust women?”

Anti-abortion groups responded with “When you work in the pro-life movement and you start to talk to women who have had abortions and you start to understand how many of them have felt coerced into that decision by their families or boyfriends or partners, you really see through this talking point of the other side,” said Mallory Quigley, according to The Blaze. Another Anti Abortion group released a video saying that it is not about trusting women it is about human rights.

[The above piece is categorized by our Editorial policy as an opinion, and does not necessarily represent the views of the entire Warrior Ink staff. – Ed.]