Nokia Sells Out To Microsoft in Attempt to Stay Relevant

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Courtesy Tribune News Service

The Nokia Lumia 635 is a decent option to consider if you're after 4G LTE on a budget. (TNS)

Before the world’s slimmest and most efficient smart phones hit the market years ago, we had heavy unreliable bricks often from Nokia. These Nokia phones were best known for their indestructible models that could safeguard the most accident prone consumer. While these phones were unsightly and resembled embarrassingly close to industrial brick products, when referring to the late 90’s and early 00’s they are a common hot topic.

After the onset of smart phones flooded the market these Nokia phones quickly became obsolete and fell down the list of must-have phones. With no luck trying to revamp their ailing phone company, manufacturers sold the production to Microsoft for $7.2 billion. The deal was timely for Microsoft because they were seeking to expand their company to stay competitive with other Android and smartphone corporations.

“The opportunity for Microsoft to be both a devices and services company, so that it can deliver the complete proposition to its consumers, is at the heart of this,” said Stephen Elop, former Nokia CEO and now executive vice president of the Devices Group at Microsoft

Under the institution of Microsoft the Nokia label was able to expand their obsolete merchandise to resemble the more modern smart phone. While it was a nice surprise for many consumers the Nokia Lumia still did not crack up to the mainstream iphone brand. Furthermore, Microsoft has had to relocate their Nokia production to a different market, to Brazil and Mexico, in attempt to encourage higher sales.

Even so, recently rumors are emerging that the Nokia brand is making a comeback with Android material. This was reported on a Chinese blog, however, Nokia quickly refuted this comment with the statement:

“Nokia notes recent news reports claiming the company communicated an intention to manufacture consumer handsets out of a R&D facility in China,” the company said. “These reports are false, and include comments incorrectly attributed to a Nokia Networks executive.”

Sadly, Nokia will not be making a comeback anytime soon so we will have to continue to live in the nostalgic age of Nokia.